Deploying Ubuntu OpenStack Kilo

My previous Ubuntu OpenStack setup has been using the Juno release. I received some installation problems for Kilo using the stable repo and so I switched to using the experimental repo. This comes with a number of surface changes.

  • The interactive installation asks for the installation type first, and password second.
  • The IP range of installed OpenStack services changes from 10.0.4.x to 10.0.7.x.
  • Juju GUI is no longer installed by default. You need to specifically add this as a service after initial installation.
  • The GUI displays additional information during installation.
  • The LXC container name changes from uoi-bootstrap to openstack-single-<user>.

Uninstall any existing environment

Remove any existing installed OpenStack cloud.

sudo openstack-install -k
sudo openstack-install -u

NOTE: Be sure to remove your existing cloud before upgrading. Failing to do so will mean you need to manually cleanup some things with:

sudo lxc-stop --name uoi-bootstrap
sudo lxc-destroy --name uoi-bootstrap
rm -rf $HOME/.cloud_install

Update the OpenStack installer

Upgrade Ubuntu OpenStack with the following commands. In my environment this installed version 0.99.14.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:cloud-installer/experimental
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade openstack

Install OpenStack Kilo

Installing an Ubuntu OpenStack environment still uses the openstack-install command with an additional argument.

sudo openstack-install --upstream-ppa

NOTE: Updated 6/18/15 When using the experimental repo with version 0.99.12 or earlier you must specify the --extra-ppa argument and value, i.e. sudo openstack-install –extra-ppa ppa:cloud-installer/experimental. Thanks stokachu for pointing this out.

Adding Services

After setting up a Kilo cloud using Ubuntu OpenStack I was able to successfully add a Swift component. Something else that was not quite working as expected in stable.

References

Tracking the Ubuntu OpenStack installation process

Following on from Installing Ubuntu OpenStack the following steps help you navigate around the single server installation, monitoring and debugging the installation process.

Configuration

The initial execution of the installer will create a default config.yaml file that defines the container and OpenStack services. After a successful installation this looks like:

$ more $HOME/.cloud-install/config.yaml
container_ip: 10.0.3.149
current_state: 2
deploy_complete: true
install_type: Single
openstack_password: openstack
openstack_release: juno
placements:
  controller:
    assignments:
      LXC:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - glance
      - glance-simplestreams-sync
      - openstack-dashboard
      - juju-gui
      - keystone
      - mysql
      - neutron-api
      - neutron-openvswitch
      - rabbitmq-server
    constraints:
      cpu-cores: 2
      mem: 6144
      root-disk: 20480
  nova-compute-machine-0:
    assignments:
      BareMetal:
      - nova-compute
    constraints:
      mem: 4096
      root-disk: 40960
  quantum-gateway-machine-0:
    assignments:
      BareMetal:
      - quantum-gateway
    constraints:
      mem: 2048
      root-disk: 20480

This file changes during the installation process which I described later.

The LXC Container

The single server installation is managed within a single LXC container. You can obtain details of and connect to the container with the following.

$ sudo lxc-ls --fancy
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
uoi-bootstrap  RUNNING  10.0.3.149, 10.0.4.1, 192.168.122.1  -     YES      

$ sudo lxc-info --name uoi-bootstrap
Name:           uoi-bootstrap
State:          RUNNING
PID:            19623
IP:             10.0.3.149
IP:             10.0.4.1
IP:             192.168.122.1
CPU use:        27692.85 seconds
BlkIO use:      63.94 GiB
Memory use:     24.29 GiB
KMem use:       0 bytes
Link:           vethC0E9US
 TX bytes:      507.43 MiB
 RX bytes:      1.43 GiB
 Total bytes:   1.93 GiB

$ sudo lxc-attach --name uoi-bootstrap

You can also connect to the server directly. As I prefer to NEVER configure or connect to a server as root this is how I access the LXC container.

$ ssh ubuntu@10.0.3.149

Juju Status

When connected to the LXC container you can then look at the status of the Juju orchestration with.

$ export JUJU_HOME=~/.cloud-install/juju

$ juju status
environment: local
machines:
  "0":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: localhost
    instance-id: localhost
    series: trusty
    state-server-member-status: has-vote
  "1":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.62
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-1
    series: trusty
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=1 mem=4096M root-disk=40960M
  "2":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.77
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2
    series: trusty
    containers:
      2/lxc/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.147
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-0
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/1:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.15
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-1
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/2:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.135
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-2
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/3:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.133
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-3
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/4:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.119
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-4
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/5:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.88
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-5
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/6:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.155
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-6
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/7:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.36
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-7
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
      2/lxc/8:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.11
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-2-lxc-8
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=2 mem=6144M root-disk=20480M
  "3":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.10
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-3
    series: trusty
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=1 mem=2048M root-disk=20480M
  "4":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.96
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-4
    series: trusty
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=1 mem=512M root-disk=8192M
  "5":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.140
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-5
    series: trusty
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=1 mem=512M root-disk=8192M
  "6":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.197
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-6
    series: trusty
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=1 mem=512M root-disk=8192M
services:
  glance:
    charm: cs:trusty/glance-11
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      cluster:
      - glance
      identity-service:
      - keystone
      image-service:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - nova-compute
      object-store:
      - swift-proxy
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      glance/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/4
        open-ports:
        - 9292/tcp
        public-address: 10.0.4.119
  glance-simplestreams-sync:
    charm: local:trusty/glance-simplestreams-sync-0
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      identity-service:
      - keystone
    units:
      glance-simplestreams-sync/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/5
        public-address: 10.0.4.88
  juju-gui:
    charm: cs:trusty/juju-gui-16
    exposed: false
    units:
      juju-gui/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/1
        open-ports:
        - 80/tcp
        - 443/tcp
        public-address: 10.0.4.15
  keystone:
    charm: cs:trusty/keystone-12
    exposed: false
    relations:
      cluster:
      - keystone
      identity-service:
      - glance
      - glance-simplestreams-sync
      - neutron-api
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - openstack-dashboard
      - swift-proxy
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      keystone/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/2
        public-address: 10.0.4.135
  mysql:
    charm: cs:trusty/mysql-12
    exposed: false
    relations:
      cluster:
      - mysql
      shared-db:
      - glance
      - keystone
      - neutron-api
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - nova-compute
      - quantum-gateway
    units:
      mysql/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/0
        public-address: 10.0.4.147
  neutron-api:
    charm: cs:trusty/neutron-api-6
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      cluster:
      - neutron-api
      identity-service:
      - keystone
      neutron-api:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      neutron-plugin-api:
      - neutron-openvswitch
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      neutron-api/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/7
        open-ports:
        - 9696/tcp
        public-address: 10.0.4.36
  neutron-openvswitch:
    charm: cs:trusty/neutron-openvswitch-2
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      neutron-plugin:
      - nova-compute
      neutron-plugin-api:
      - neutron-api
    subordinate-to:
    - nova-compute
  nova-cloud-controller:
    charm: cs:trusty/nova-cloud-controller-51
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      cloud-compute:
      - nova-compute
      cluster:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      identity-service:
      - keystone
      image-service:
      - glance
      neutron-api:
      - neutron-api
      quantum-network-service:
      - quantum-gateway
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      nova-cloud-controller/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/3
        open-ports:
        - 3333/tcp
        - 8773/tcp
        - 8774/tcp
        - 9696/tcp
        public-address: 10.0.4.133
  nova-compute:
    charm: cs:trusty/nova-compute-14
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      cloud-compute:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      compute-peer:
      - nova-compute
      image-service:
      - glance
      neutron-plugin:
      - neutron-openvswitch
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      nova-compute/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: "1"
        public-address: 10.0.4.62
        subordinates:
          neutron-openvswitch/0:
            upgrading-from: cs:trusty/neutron-openvswitch-2
            agent-state: started
            agent-version: 1.20.11.1
            public-address: 10.0.4.62
  openstack-dashboard:
    charm: cs:trusty/openstack-dashboard-9
    exposed: false
    relations:
      cluster:
      - openstack-dashboard
      identity-service:
      - keystone
    units:
      openstack-dashboard/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/6
        open-ports:
        - 80/tcp
        - 443/tcp
        public-address: 10.0.4.155
  quantum-gateway:
    charm: cs:trusty/quantum-gateway-10
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - rabbitmq-server
      cluster:
      - quantum-gateway
      quantum-network-service:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      quantum-gateway/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: "3"
        public-address: 10.0.4.10
  rabbitmq-server:
    charm: cs:trusty/rabbitmq-server-26
    exposed: false
    relations:
      amqp:
      - glance
      - glance-simplestreams-sync
      - neutron-api
      - neutron-openvswitch
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - nova-compute
      - quantum-gateway
      cluster:
      - rabbitmq-server
    units:
      rabbitmq-server/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 2/lxc/8
        open-ports:
        - 5672/tcp
        public-address: 10.0.4.11

You can also look at a subset of the status for a particular service, for example keystone with:

$ juju status keystone
environment: local
machines:
  "1":
    agent-state: started
    agent-version: 1.20.11.1
    dns-name: 10.0.4.128
    instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-1
    series: trusty
    containers:
      1/lxc/2:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        dns-name: 10.0.4.142
        instance-id: ubuntu-local-machine-1-lxc-2
        series: trusty
        hardware: arch=amd64
    hardware: arch=amd64 cpu-cores=2 mem=6144M root-disk=20480M
services:
  keystone:
    charm: cs:trusty/keystone-12
    exposed: false
    relations:
      cluster:
      - keystone
      identity-service:
      - glance
      - glance-simplestreams-sync
      - neutron-api
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - openstack-dashboard
      shared-db:
      - mysql
    units:
      keystone/0:
        agent-state: started
        agent-version: 1.20.11.1
        machine: 1/lxc/2
        public-address: 10.0.4.142

Monitoring the Installation

When performing an installation you can monitor the executed commands with:

$ tail -f $HOME/.cloud-install/commands.log

...

This provides a lot of debugging output. A streamlined logging is actually possible with automated installation described later.

Uninstalling

As the single server instance is in a LXC container, as the documentation states uninstalling the environment is a rather trivial process that takes only a few seconds.

This will teardown the cloud but leaving userdata available for a subsequent deployment.

$ sudo openstack-install -k
Warning:

This will destroy the host Container housing the OpenStack private cloud. This is a permanent operation.
Proceed? [y/N] Y
Removing static route
Removing host container...
Container is removed.

You can also do a more permanent uninstall of the cloud and packages.

$ sudo openstack-install -u
Warning:

This will uninstall OpenStack and make a best effort to return the system back to its original state.
Proceed? [y/N] Y
Restoring system to last known state.
Ubuntu Openstack Installer Uninstalling ...Single install path.

This does not however seem to cleanup $HOME/.cloud-install. You can safely remove this or move it sideways when re-deploying without any issues.

Installation automation

As described in my original post, the openstack-install script is a cursors-based interactive view. You can automate the installation by defining the needed setup inputs in a separate configuration file and running in headless mode.

$ echo "install_type: Single
openstack_password: openstack" > install.yaml

$ sudo openstack-install --headless --config install.yaml

This has the added benefit providing a more meaningful log of the state of the installation with less verbose information then in the commands.log file.

[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.install] Running in headless mode.
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.install] Performing a Single Install
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.task] [TASKLIST] ['Initializing Environment', 'Creating container', 'Bootstrapping Juju']
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.task] [TASK] Initializing Environment
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Building environment
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.single_install] Prepared userdata: {'extra_sshkeys': ['ssh-rsa ...\n'], 'seed_command': ['env', 'pollinate', '-q']}
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:42 • cloudinstall.single_install] Setting permissions for user rbradfor
[INFO  • 06-02 12:02:43 • cloudinstall.task] [TASK] Creating container
[INFO  • 06-02 12:04:20 • cloudinstall.single_install] Setting DHCP properties for host container.
[INFO  • 06-02 12:04:20 • cloudinstall.single_install] Adding static route for 10.0.4.0/24 via 10.0.3.160
...
[INFO  • 06-02 12:22:50 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of nova-cloud-controller: pending
[INFO  • 06-02 12:23:31 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of nova-cloud-controller: installed
[INFO  • 06-02 12:23:52 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of nova-cloud-controller: started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:24:34 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of keystone: started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:24:44 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of keystone: started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:24:44 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of nova-cloud-controller: started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:27:38 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of quantum-gateway: started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:27:38 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking availability of nova-cloud-controller: started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:27:38 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Validating network parameters for Neutron
[INFO  • 06-02 12:27:53 • cloudinstall.consoleui] All systems go!=

And 25 minutes later you have an available cloud.

If you attempt to look at the GUI status page with openstack-status you will be given a text based version of messages like.

$ sudo openstack-status
[INFO  • 06-02 12:06:21 • cloudinstall.core] Running openstack-status in headless mode.
[INFO  • 06-02 12:06:21 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Loaded placements from file.
[INFO  • 06-02 12:06:21 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 3 unknown
[INFO  • 06-02 12:08:20 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 1 pending, 2 unknown
[INFO  • 06-02 12:08:48 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 2 pending, 1 unknown
[INFO  • 06-02 12:09:04 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 1 down (started), 1 pending, 1 unknown
[INFO  • 06-02 12:09:13 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 1 down (started), 2 pending
[INFO  • 06-02 12:09:20 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 2 down (started), 1 pending
[INFO  • 06-02 12:09:26 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 1 pending, 2 started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:09:51 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Waiting for machines to start: 1 down (started), 2 started
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:44 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Verifying service deployments
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:44 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Missing ConsoleUI() attribute: set_pending_deploys
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:44 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking if MySQL is deployed
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:44 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Deploying MySQL to machine lxc:1
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:49 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Deployed MySQL.
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:49 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking if Juju GUI is deployed
[INFO  • 06-02 12:10:49 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Deploying Juju GUI to machine lxc:1
[INFO  • 06-02 12:11:00 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Deployed Juju GUI.
[INFO  • 06-02 12:11:00 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Checking if Keystone is deployed
[INFO  • 06-02 12:11:00 • cloudinstall.consoleui] Deploying Keystone to machine lxc:1
...

It seems you can trick it into providing both a GUI and text version with the following in another shell session.

$ sed -ie "/headless/d" $HOME/.cloud-install/config.yaml
$ sudo openstack-status

NOTE: You will not get any output until the initial container is completed. This also leaves a .pid file that must be manually cleaned up if you run to soon. The next invocation provides the following message.

$ sudo openstack-status
Another instance of openstack-status is running. If you're sure there are no other instances, please remove ~/.cloud-install/openstack.pid
$ rm $HOME/.cloud-install/openstack.pid

Monitoring the installation progress

The running config.yaml file changes over the duration of the installation.
It’s most basic configuration (when starting with the GUI) is:

$ more $HOME/.cloud-install/config.yaml
current_state: 0
openstack_release: juno

The release is also defined in the $HOME/.cloud-install/openstack_release file.

When starting by passing the configuration as previously mentioned it’s initial state is:

$ more $HOME/.cloud-install/config.yaml
config_file: install.yaml
current_state: 0
headless: true
install_type: Single
openstack_password: openstack
openstack_release: juno

This is updated when the LXC container is installed.

$ more $HOME/.cloud-install/config.yaml
config_file: install.yaml
container_ip: 10.0.3.77
current_state: 0
headless: true
install_type: Single
openstack_password: openstack
openstack_release: juno

And also updated during installation, such as.

$ more $HOME/.cloud-install/config.yaml
config_file: install.yaml
container_ip: 10.0.3.77
current_state: 0
headless: true
install_type: Single
openstack_password: openstack
openstack_release: juno
placements:
  controller:
    assignments:
      LXC:
      - nova-cloud-controller
      - glance
      - glance-simplestreams-sync
      - openstack-dashboard
      - juju-gui
      - keystone
      - mysql
      - neutron-api
      - neutron-openvswitch
      - rabbitmq-server
    constraints:
      cpu-cores: 2
      mem: 6144
      root-disk: 20480
  nova-compute-machine-0:
    assignments:
      BareMetal:
      - nova-compute
    constraints:
      mem: 4096
      root-disk: 40960
  quantum-gateway-machine-0:
    assignments:
      BareMetal:
      - quantum-gateway
    constraints:
      mem: 2048
      root-disk: 20480

When completed the configuration has the following settings.

config_file: install.yaml
container_ip: 10.0.3.77
current_state: 2
deploy_complete: true
install_type: Single
openstack_password: openstack
openstack_release: juno
placements:
...

Problems

When using the GUI installer the first time you quit (using Q), it seems to leave the terminal state wrong. The following will reset this to normal use.

$ stty sane  ^j    # (i.e. Ctrl-J together).

Subsequent uses of openstack-status do not have the same problem.

References

In my next post I am going to talk about the analysis taken to debug errors in the installation, starting with Keystone – hook failed: “config-changed” message I got attempting to install kilo, and hence this more detailed analysis of the installation process components.

Installing Ubuntu OpenStack

The The Canonical Distribution of Ubuntu OpenStack provides a simple installer to run an OpenStack cloud. You can deploy a simple single machine setup with fully containerized services (11 in total), or a multi server installation leveraging MAAS – Metal as a Service and Landscape Autopilot.

Installation

This post describes my experiences with the single machine setup on a 4 core machine with 32GB of RAM with a clean Ubuntu 14.04 LTS OS. The installation requires the following commands to configure the repo, install and configure your OpenStack cloud. In this example, the installed version is 0.22.3.

sudo apt-add-repository -y ppa:cloud-installer/stable
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y openstack
sudo openstack-install --version
sudo openstack-install

The final step uses a cusors-based interface and only requires two steps before the installation.

  • Specify a password
  • Specify the install type




The UI provides a progress status of the installation. Initially new containers will start with a Pending status. Following the starting of the Juju GUI container the footer bar shows the URL for the JujuGUI, in my case http://10.0.4.112. Following the starting of the Openstack Dashboard you will then get a Horizon URL also detailed in the footer such as http://10.0.4.74/horizon.






Horizon

The Horizon display is what you generally expect.




JujuGUI

The JujuGUI provides a display of the deployment orchestration via charms. You can also drill down to specific services. An example is for the glance service using the charm cs:trusty/glance-11. This describes the relationships and configuration which are also seen in the GUI. You can also view online the full source code used to create this deployed service.




OpenStack Status

You can view the state of your containerized cloud with openstack-status which is a cursors-based display of the running installation, the same used during the installation. This displays the units deployed, status messages and a footer URL bar that indicates the URL’s of Horizon and JujuGUI. Each time you invoke this it will also check services, as indicated by the [INFO] messages.


Connecting to Containers

The installer will automatically create a SSH key for the user that you use to run the openstack-install command. This enables you to SSH to any of the containers, for example to connect to the MySQL container.

ssh ubuntu@10.0.4.90
$ mysql -uroot -p`sudo cat /var/lib/mysql/mysql.passwd` -e "SHOW SCHEMAS"
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| glance             |
| keystone           |
| mysql              |
| neutron            |
| nova               |
| performance_schema |
+--------------------+

You can use the various OpenStack clients to access OpenStack services. These are not installed by default.

sudo apt-get install -y python-glanceclient python-openstackclient python-novaclient python-keystoneclient
$ source $HOME/.cloud-install/openstack-admin-rc
$ glance image-list
+--------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------------------------+-------------+------------------+-----------+--------+
| ID                                   | Name                                                          | Disk Format | Container Format | Size      | Status |
+--------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------------------------+-------------+------------------+-----------+--------+
| f3cd4ec6-8ce6-4a44-85ec-2f8f066f351b | auto-sync/ubuntu-trusty-14.04-amd64-server-20150528-disk1.img | qcow2       | bare             | 257294848 | active |
+--------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------------------------+-------------+------------------+-----------+--------+

More Information

Read Tracking the Ubuntu OpenStack installation process for more detailed information on monitoring the installation process.

Thanks to the New York OpenStack Group and a presentation by Mark Baker of Canonical who demonstrated MAAS and Landscape AutoPilot installation of OpenStack. Slides of Automating hard things slides.

Installing Ubuntu Desktop 10.04 with LVM

With a new quad core desktop with 8GB RAM & 1TB HDD I wanted to install the Ubuntu desktop version using LVM. This is not possible with the “Desktop CD”. You need to use the “alternative CD” which will easily allow you to configure LVM via a text/cursors installation and also give you a deskop GNOME environment. The “Server CD” also gives you LVM options, but no GUI.

While there are complicated instructions on how to configure/setup LVM with various versions of Ubuntu, all you need with Ubuntu 10.04 is the right CD.

While installing I also read up on two tips that I found of benefit.

  • During installation of the base system, package unpacking and setup messages are redirected to tty4. You can access this terminal by pressing Left Alt+F4; get back to the main installer process with Left Alt+F1.
  • You can get a terminal window easily during installation by switching to the second virtual console by pressing Left Alt+F2

Installation was rather seamless, the only annoyance the cursors interface not displaying clearly on my Dell 2407WFP monitor during the installation process. Monitor works fine with installed GUI at 1920×1200.

Getting wireless working on Ubuntu Macbook

I run Ubuntu 9.04 Januty on my Macbook. Previously installing Ubuntu 8.10, wireless worked automatically, for 9.04 it did not.

This is what I did to fix it.

  1. Verify your Macbook is seeing the Broadcom controller. See below for the lspci command, and expected output.
  2. Goto System -> Administration -> Hardware Drivers. The Broadcom STA wireless driver is activated, deactivate it.
  3. Add to /etc/modules a line with wl
  4. Reboot
  5. Goto System -> Administration -> Hardware Drivers. Activate the Broadcom STA wireless driver.
  6. Reboot
  7. Wireless now operational.
$ lspci
...
02:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4328 802.11a/b/g/n (rev 03)
03:00.0 Ethernet controller: Marvell Technology Group Ltd. Marvell Yukon 88E8058 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller (rev 13)
04:03.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Agere Systems FW323 (rev 61)

For reference, modprobe wl does not return any output in my environment, yet wireless works fine.

References:

multi-threaded memcached

I discovered while compiling Wafflegrid today that by default, the Ubuntu binaries for memcached are not-multithreaded.

Following the installation of memcached from apt-get and libmemcached I ran memslap for:

$ memslap -s localhost
    Threads connecting to servers 1
    Took 1.633 seconds to load data

$ memstat -s localhost
Listing 1 Server

Server: localhost (11211)
     pid: 23868
     uptime: 54
     time: 1244575816
     version: 1.2.2
     pointer_size: 32
     rusage_user: 0.90000
     rusage_system: 0.120000
     curr_items: 10000
     total_items: 10000
     bytes: 5430000
     curr_connections: 1
     total_connections: 3
     connection_structures: 2
     cmd_get: 0
     cmd_set: 10000
     get_hits: 0
     get_misses: 0
     evictions: 0
     bytes_read: 5430000
     bytes_written: 5430000
     limit_maxbytes: 0
     threads: 1

By installed the Latest RC 1.4.0 we see.

memslap -s localhost
    Threads connecting to servers 1
    Took 0.866 seconds to load data

memstat -s localhost

Listing 1 Server

Server: localhost (11211)
     pid: 8651
     uptime: 375
     time: 1244577237
     version: 1.4.0-rc1
     pointer_size: 32
     rusage_user: 0.110000
     rusage_system: 0.130000
     curr_items: 10000
     total_items: 10000
     bytes: 5510000
     curr_connections: 5
     total_connections: 8
     connection_structures: 6
     cmd_get: 0
     cmd_set: 10000
     get_hits: 0
     get_misses: 0
     evictions: 0
     bytes_read: 5510000
     bytes_written: 5510000
     limit_maxbytes: 0
     threads: 5

Thanks Matt for pointing that one out.

VirtualBox, compiling Part 2

So I managed to find all dependencies after some trial and error for compiling VirtualBox 1.6.4 under Ubuntu 8.0.4, then finding the Linux build instructions to confirm.

It was not successful however in building, throwing the following error:

kBuild: Compiling dyngen - dyngen.c
kBuild: Linking dyngen
kmk[2]: Leaving directory `/usr/local/VirtualBox-1.6.4/src/recompiler'
kmk[2]: Entering directory `/usr/local/VirtualBox-1.6.4/src/apps'
kmk[2]: pass_bldprogs: No such file or directory
kmk[2]: *** No rule to make target `pass_bldprogs'. Stop.
kmk[2]: Leaving directory `/usr/local/VirtualBox-1.6.4/src/apps'
kmk[1]: *** [pass_bldprogs_before] Error 2
kmk[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/local/Virtu

More searching, I needed to add two more files manually. Read More Here.

A long wait, compiling for 20+ minutes, and a necessary reboot as upgraded images threw another error, I got 1.6.4 running, and able to boot Fedora Core 9 image created under 1.5.6

But the real test, and the need for this version was to install Intrepid.

This also failed with a Kernel panic during boot. More info to see this reported as a Ubuntu Bug and Virtual Box Bug.

More work still needed.