Archive for the ‘Google’ Category

Hurting the little guy?

Monday, March 16th, 2009

Today I come back from the dentist, if that wasn’t bad enough news, I get an email from Google AdWords titled Your Google AdWords Approval Status.

In the email, all my AdWords campaigns are now disapproved, because of:

SUGGESTIONS:
-> Ad Content: Please remove the following trademark from your ad:
mysql.

Yeah right. I can’t put the word ‘MySQL’ in my ads. How are people to now find me? It would appear that many ads have been pulled not just mine. Is this a proactive measure by Google? is this a complaint from the MySQL trademark holder Sun Microsystems?

I’d like any comment, feedback or suggestions on how one can proceed here.

It reminds me of the days CentOS advertised itself as an “Open source provider of a popular North American Operating System”, or something of that nature.

What is Google’s direction?

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008

Tonight over discussion was Android and what is Google’s ultimate direction. Have they lost their way, or are they just planning to explode with so many new things that will revolutionize what and how we do things. With $475,000 first price for Android, they certainly have the money available to invest in new directions.

I arrive home, and find email discussion on The Google Browser – Chrome.

Inquisitive, I take a look, to find the great teaser, nothing by a comic, come back tomorrow for the download link. Is that clever to leak information, have everybody write about it and check back tomorrow?

Generating Word Clouds

Saturday, June 21st, 2008

I came across a wicked cool tool at wondle.net. I wanted to create a word cloud for the back of a business card, now I know how.

What determines authoritative information

Wednesday, June 18th, 2008

I had need to visit a particular store in New York on Sunday on referral by a friend. I knew they had two locations. Like all tech savvy people I googled sports authority new york. I even visited the website from the link of the top result (with map). I typed in the address into my iPhone as listed by the map, why somebody hasn’t invented a means to point and click that I don’t know (it probably does exist, but finding it and knowing about it is a completely more complex problem). I even clicked on the map and zoomed in for nearest subway stop.

I got on the NY subway and headed into Manhattan. What resulted was me scratching my head when I could not find the intended store. In fact, the store never existed at 57 W 57th St. Even trying the phone number as per Google resulted in a no answer. Fortunately the trusty iPhone with Internet access and viewing the store locator on the official Sports Authority website enabled me to find the closest store, over a mile away.

I have often joked about the reliance on online information and the assumption of accurate information from even trusted sites. I’ve used this example previously, I know 1 mile is approximately 1.6 kilometers, and if you put in “convert 1 mile to kilometer” Google gives you an answer of “1 mile = 1.609344 kilometer”. What if that was indeed wrong, and it was 1.659344 for example.

Where are the safeguards for verifying information? Could it even be possible?
The benefit of information available readily does not equate to good information, indeed today searching for something can provide too much information and not exactly what you are seeking.

One wonders!

Working with Google App Engine

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008

Yesterday I took a more serious look at Google App Engine, I got a developer account some weeks ago.

After going though the getting started demo some time ago, I chose an idea for a FaceBook Application and started in true eXtreme Programming (XP) style (i.e. What’s the bare minimum required for first iteration). I taught myself some Python and within just a few minutes had some working data being randomly generated totally within the development SDK environment On my MacBook. I was not able to deploy initially via the big blue deploy button, the catch is you have to register the application manually online.

Then it all worked, and hey presto I’ve got my application up at provided domain hosting at appspot.com

Having coming from a truly relational environment, most notably MySQL of recent years I found the Datastore API different in a number of ways.

  • There is no means of Sequences/Auto Increment. There is an internal Unique Key, but it’s a String, not an integer, not enabling me to re-use it.
  • The ListProperty enables the use of Lists in Python (like Arrays) to be easily stored.
  • The ReferenceProperty is used as a foreign key relationship, and then can be more reference within an object hierarchy
  • I really missed an interactive interface. You have no abililty to look at your data, specifically for me I wanted to seek some data, then I wanted to delete some data, but I had to do all this via code.

Having developed a skelaton FaceBook application before in PHP, I figured a Python version would not be that much more work, but here is where I good stumped Information at Hosting a Facebook Application on Google AppEngine leveraging the PyFacebook project didn’t enable me to integrate Google App Engine with FaceBook just yet.

This had me thinking I need to resort to a standalone simply Python Facebook application to confirm the PyFacebook usage. Now my problems started. Under Mac it’s a lot more complex to install and configure Python/Django etc then under Linux. I tried to do it on my dedicated server, but drat Python is at 2.3.4, and it seems 2.5.x is needed.

Still it was a valuable exercise, I dropped the FaceBook goal and just worked on more Google App Engine stuff. Still early days, but it was productive to try out this new technology.

What I need to work on now is how to hold state within Python infrastructure so I can manage a user login and storing and retrieving user data for my sample app.

Log Buffer #94: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Saturday, April 26th, 2008

April 25th, 2008 – by Ronald Bradford

Welcome to the 94th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of the database blogsphere. Adding to the list of usual database suspects, I have some more alternative considerations for our readers this week.

We start with Conferences

Still some discussion from last weeks’ 2008 MySQL Conference & Expo.

Baron “xarpb” Schwartz calls it correct in Like it or not, it is the MySQL Conference and Expo. Matt Assay of c|net gives us some of his opinions in three posts Two great posts on MySQL, Back to the future for MySQL and Between two consenting corporations… in followup to last week’s active slashdot discussion. Many others have also commented if you have not been following the news released before opening keynotes.

If you didn’t get a hard copy, Sheeri Kritzer Cabral has published the Pythian EXPLAIN Cheatsheet many attendees received.

Also last week was Collaborate 08 – Technology and Applications IOUG forum for the Oracle Community.

This week we also see the Web 2.0 San Francisco in action, and excitement is also brewing for the PGCon – PostgreSQL Conference for Users and Developers happening in under a month as Robert Treat has Plane tickets booked for PGCon. Postgres was also visible at the MySQL Conference & Expo if you were looking with a prominent consulting team downing the blue elephant during the event. Wish I’d taken a photo now!

Still more news from Adam Machanic of the Pythian group with SQLTeach Toronto: Almost Here.

Common threads

The 2008 Google Summer of Code announced this week showcases the Open Source databases MySQL (14 projects) and PostgreSQL (6 projects). Kaj Arnö talks more in Fourteen Summer of Code projects accepted 2008. The company PrimeBase Technologies also features strongly with two projects for the Blob Streaming storage engine for MySQL as I detail in Media Blob Streaming getting a Google boost.

MySQL

DTrace Integration with MySQL 5.0 – Chime demo in MySQL Users Conference 2008 by Jenny Chen is an example of Sun’s Open Source contribution to MySQL which I saw as a physical demo last week. Unfortunately, due to the imbalance in actually getting new functionality into Community contributions (actually non existence in current or next mysql version :-( ), this functionality is only really for show. Dtrace with MySQL 6.0.5 – on a Mac describes some of this work actually making it into the next, next version. It seems this next Falcon Preview is available but not announced by MySQL generally as I note in Continued confusion in MySQL/Sun release policy.

MySQL Gurus Mark Callaghan and Brian Aker comment respectively here and here on MySQL Heap (Memory) Engine – Dynamic Row Format Support. Work submitted by Igor Chernyshev of eBay Kernel Team (whom I’ve met previously and was most impressed with his ability to submit MySQL patch work, with little previous MySQL kernel knowledge, but extensive C++ knowledge). This work also contributed to eBay Wins Application of the Year at MySQL Conference & Expo.

Mark also mentions in his post “How do users get it? There is no community branch into which people can submit changes with a GPL license.“. A topic your’s truly has also mentioned regarding the Community contributions, development and release. Perhaps a sign of more benefit to the community soon as Monty mentions.

Baron Schwartz comments on Keith “a.k.a Kevin” Murphy’s work in Spring 2008 issue of MySQL Magazine. With a quick plug also for his upcoming book “High Performance MySQL – Version 2″ (me giving it a plug also now), Baron also has the best published anti-spam sniffer email I’ve seen, and recently updated to his new employer. Check his blog and let me know.

Postgres

Joshus Drake of Command Prompt Inc. The Postgres Company gets excited in Is that performance I smell? Ext2 vs Ext3 on 50 spindles, testing for PostgreSQL and gives us some insight into different settings of two popular file system types. It would be great to see a follow up with a few more different filesystems types.

Pabloj “so many trails … so little time” extends his MySQL example to Postgres in Loading data from files. And on Postgres Online Journal, we get An Almost Idiot’s Guide to PostgreSQL YUM giving you a step by step guide of PostgreSQL setup, including the all important “Backing up Old Version”.

Oracle

We get a detailed book chapter from Keith Lake of Oracle OLAP The most powerful, open Analytic Engine in his extensive post on Tuning Guidance for OLAP 10g. David Litchfield brings attention in A New Class of Vulnerability in Oracle: Lateral SQL Injection. The title is sufficient for all Oracle DBA’s to review.

Don Seiler gives his experience in Bind Variables and Parallel Queries Do Not Mix when an Oracle Bug is discovered the database to 64-bit H/W..
Matching LOB Indexes and Segments by Michael McLaughlin gives us a good CASE/REGEX SQL example exam question, and simple output to monitor the growth of LOBs in your Oracle database.
Additional readings for Oracle folks can be found with Kenneth Downs writing Advanced Table Design: Resolutions and Dan Norris’ Collaborate 08 thoughts gives a concise review of a largely attended Oracle event.

SQL Server

B Esakkiappan’s SQL Thoughts gives us a throughout lesson on SQL Server 2005 Database Transaction logs with Know the Transaction LOG – Part – 1, Part – 2, Part – 3 and Part -4 Restoring Data.

Paul S. Randal of SQL Skills adds Conference Questions Pot-Pourri: How to create Agent alerts to his writings following many requests after a recent workshop.

In Scalability features I would like to have in SQL Server Michael Zilberstein lists 3 key features including “Active-Active cluster”, “Indexes per partition” and “Bitmap indexes and function based indexes”.

Ingres, Times Ten, Google App Engine and more

Some movement in the Ingres world with Deb Woods of Ingres Technology Blog discussing in Inside the Community – Ingres style…. the Ingres Engineering Summit occurring this week. Attendees included newbies to a 24 year Ingres veteran. That beats my experience in Ingres which now extends 19 years.

We get another very detailed installation description, this time for Times Ten in Install Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database 7.0.4 on Linux.

Just a few weeks ago, a new database offering hit the market with the Google App Engine. News this week includes
Google App Engine Hack-a-thons! being announced with events in New York on May 7th and San Francisco on May 16th. As a developer with an account and an excuse to use it more, I can’t win, being in the right towns on the wrong dates.

OakLeaf Systems this week writes Comparing Google App Engine, Amazon SimpleDB and Microsoft SQL Server Data Services. Another good read just for comparison.

Not in a blog, but in discussion in at the recent MySQL, was msql. It was interesting to find out that PHP was originally developed for msql first, and only used MySQL as the preferred database after some functionality requirement. Interesting what could have been?

In Conclusion

Thanks Dave for the opportunity to contribute to the week in review. Until my chance to charm the readers next time.

I leave you with a photo, and challenge our readers to find another person who would be capable of wearing a t-shirt that states “My free software runs your company”. Michael Widenius- Founder and original developer of MySQL can, and my thanks to you for MySQL, and the Vodka shots at the Conference last week.

Happy Earth Day 2008!

Media Blob Streaming getting a Google boost

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008

The 2008 Google Summer of Code MySQL Projects are now available. MySQL has 14 listed projects, one of the ~190 different Open Source products listed. Unfortunately there is no summary to see the total number of projects being sponsored across all products.

Media Blob Streaming actually has the luxury of two approved projects, so they have plenty of mentoring work at PrimeBase Technologies.

Raj Kissu Rajandran will be working on BLOB Streaming Support for phpMyAdmin and KishoreKumar Bairi on Streaming Enabled MySQL Driver for PHP. Welcome to world of open source for your respective projects.

Trying out Google App Engine

Saturday, April 12th, 2008

I got my registration for Google App Engine this morning after being Waitlisted previously.

Between flying for about 15 hrs tomorrow and then the 2008 MySQL Conference & Expo where I’m presenting and running an Exhibitors booth, fat chance I’ll get to look into this much over the next week.

Pity!

Wait listing for Google App Engine

Tuesday, April 8th, 2008

TechCrunch announced Google Jumps Head First Into Web Services With Google App Engine so I jumped over to http://code.google.com/appengine to register, but I’ve been added to a waitlist. Reading more I see only 10,000 developers were initially allowed to register, I wonder how long that took to fill up.

Microsoft, Yahoo and Open Source

Sunday, February 10th, 2008

There has been plenty of press this week regarding Microsoft making a bid for Yahoo. This week the Wall Street Journal Article From Uncertain Future To Leading Yahoo Bid has prompted me to the following observations. I quote several points:

The bid, he said on the call, is “the next major milestone in Microsoft’s companywide transformation” to incorporate online services.

as Microsoft pushes the bid and, if successful, tries to meld Yahoo with Microsoft.

Microsoft had been negotiating to buy online ad company DoubleClick Inc. but lost that deal to Google, which paid $3.1 billion. Microsoft in May countered, spending $6 billion on online ad company aQuantive Inc.

While Microsoft should continue investing in its own online services, it needed to speed things up through acquisitions.

Once a company had a critical mass of buyers and sellers on its online-ad system, it could hold sway over much of the industry. In computers, Microsoft achieved that position with its Windows operating system. But on the Internet, Google was quickly taking on that role.


The Alexa Ratings has Yahoo as the number 1 real-estate property, outstripping Google. What’s important to realize that Yahoo along with many top traffic websites not only use Open Source, but their business is run on Open Source. At the database, there is MySQL powering Yahoo, Facebook, Wikipedia, YouTube, Fotolog and Flickr for example. Google also uses MySQL within critical components (not the search engine).

One can only hope that if such a bid is successful, much like the Sun acquisition of MySQL , that strong components of the Open Source ideal infects the much larger host.

I was thinking of taking this popular Tux & Microsoft Office image and badging Tux with a Yahoo logo, or perhaps he needs to be planting a big neon sign in the center.

Another new Google Maps feature – Terrain

Friday, November 30th, 2007

So checking Google Maps in the past few days and I see yet another new button, this one [Terrain]

Google Maps at Halloween

Saturday, November 3rd, 2007

If you didn’t spot it Google Maps – Street View had a Halloween icon. You can see it clearly below as I dragged it over a clear space.

The algorithm is banned in China

Friday, June 29th, 2007

This is an image I took yesterday of a billboard “The algorithm is banned in China.”. I don’t get it. This one has “Ask” in the bottom of the image.

I remember a few months ago seeing “The algorithm killed Jeeves”, and it had no reference to “Ask” on it, so I assumed it was some reference to Google Killing askjeeves.com. Need to find that photo.

Found it. I took this photo below on Apr 20, 2007. Note: there is no Ask logo like the one above.

It doesn’t take long

Friday, June 29th, 2007

Google Van is one of the sites now sporting images found as part of Google Street View which has been on line for about a month now.

What is the world coming to!

Google Street View Camera

Sunday, June 3rd, 2007

Google Maps Street View Camera
There has been plenty of news about Google Maps Street View that I blogged about recently.

I wanted to know how they do it, well here is how they do it.
Google Maps zoom: here’s the device and vehicle behind it.

There has been plenty of news this week, images of tunnels in New York, which is apparently a security risk, a guy attempting to climb over a fence in front of an apartment block, a guy leaving a known sex shop.

Some articles I found interesting were Google Zooms In Too Close for Some and All-seeing Google Street View prompts privacy fears.

Google Maps adds real-time images

Thursday, May 31st, 2007

Yesterday I was amazed to see yet another new feature in Google Maps.

A new button [Street View], gives you are real view of the street in question, you can rotate the image around 360 degrees, and move up and down the street. Now not all areas have been mapped yet, but you will see highlighted in blue what is.

It’s rather amazing what they can do. Presently they have images of San Francisco, Las Vegas, Denver, Miami and New York.

BTW: On the news tonight (Wed May 30) there is already controversy over the feature. People have been able to zoom in and see great detail of people, sometimes in places were it may be inappropriate.

Google Maps for Personal Use

Friday, April 6th, 2007

Just as I talked yesterday about Google Maps for Traffic Updates, today Google Maps released a new feature today called My Maps.

I’ve just started using it, my first map is incomplete but you can see the workings at Travel Locations

Google Maps for Traffic Updates

Thursday, April 5th, 2007

Saw a new button on Google Maps today called Traffic. Seems they are highlighting traffic congestion.

Some real life examples.
San Francisco
New York.

Below is a screen print I took today of the SF area. It was all green in Redwood City, so I had to look a little further.


Googlewear

Wednesday, November 15th, 2006

I was able to acquire my first piece of Google wear at the recent MySQL Camp Conference.

You see a look of cool Google things and little did I know you can buy a lot of it at The Google Store. Amazing!

Google – Is both friend and foe

Monday, September 25th, 2006

This is an interesting article How Google can make – or break – your company. The plight of a small business that overnight lost it’s high free search results and in the coming months say a 20% drop in sales.

The official response “Just as the web changes constantly, Google continues to modify and refine our algorithms to improve the quality of our objective search results.”

The comment made by the small business “It’s like owning a shop on a busy street corner where all the pedestrians suddenly and mysteriously vanish.” That’s gotto hurt.

The article also delves into a lot more, an interesting read.

Google Earth

Sunday, September 24th, 2006

Google Earth and Google Maps can give you some great views of our planet. Here is a full-time blog just for Google Earth.

There’s plenty of amazing things to see, check out Top Ten Coolest Things seen with Google Earth. The list includes:

  • Capsized Cruise Ship Captured in Google Earth / Maps
  • KC-135 Caught Refueling C-5 Galaxy in Mid-Air in Google Earth!
  • Huge Scale Model of Disputed Border Region of China Found in Google Earth
  • Lancaster Bomber Caught Flying in Google Earth
  • Flying Car? Not Really
  • Nude Sunbather caught by google earth.
  • Firefox Crop Circle in Google Earth
  • Google Earth Las Vegas
  • Shipwrecks Around the Google Earth
  • See African Animals in High Resolution in Google Earth

Not to be outdone, check out the Google 3D Warehouse for images like Golden Gate Bridge.

Here are a few more cool things I’ve seen. Hole, More about the hole

Google Doodles

Saturday, September 16th, 2006

Sometimes using that Firefox Google Quick Search causes you to miss out on the best part of the Google Search experience, and that is the Google Doodle.

Now while I’m tempted to include one here, I’m respecting the wishes of Google which request you use an official logo and “don’t feed the kangaroo“.

So speaking of the Kangroo, you will need to goto the Google Doodle of the 2000 Summer Olympic Games held in Sydney Australia.

Google at “The Simpsons”

Sunday, September 3rd, 2006

I have a friend that is a DBA with Fotolog. A very novel idea that works well. Worth browsing to see what people take photos of. You never know what you find. I thought this was cool. You can view some of my photos here.

Original Source

Google Talk

Tuesday, May 30th, 2006

Google has like many before it such as AOL, Yahoo and Skype created it’s own online chat program, which you can run with a windows program and which is very neatly integrated into Gmail.com. However I don’t use windows, I use Linux and by using the Jabber protocol Google Talk is designed to be compatible with other talk clients.

I just could not get the sucker to operate within Gaim successfully. Seems I was missing an advanced setting as found at http://www.google.com/support/talk/bin/answer.py?answer=24073 Now I have a successful login, I just need some other friends to join Google Talk

Seaching Google in Klingon or Elmer Fudd

Monday, May 29th, 2006

Sometimes I wonder how I get to trivial information. Well in the Wikipedia article Google Hoaxes you will find that the Google search engine is valid in a number of unusual languages including Klingon. I’m a Star Trek fan, but that’s going a little to far, however I guess if they create Elvish Language the LOTR people would love it. My favourites are Elmer Fudd and Bork Bork Bork. For those that don’t know this line, it’s famous from the Chef in the Muppets.

 

There are plenty more, I noticed the added Hacker recently. What’s really funny is select a language, then go back to the languages page, and see if you understand the names of the other languages. 

My original Blog Post Some light hearted Google Fun

The GWT

Sunday, May 28th, 2006

So what is GWT? An extract from the Google Web Toolkit Web Page.


Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is a Java software development framework that makes writing AJAX applications like Google Maps and Gmail easy for developers who don’t speak browser quirks as a second language. Writing dynamic web applications today is a tedious and error-prone process; you spend 90% of your time working around subtle incompatibilities between web browsers and platforms, and JavaScript’s lack of modularity makes sharing, testing, and reusing AJAX components difficult and fragile.

GWT lets you avoid many of these headaches while offering your users the same dynamic, standards-compliant experience. You write your front end in the Java programming language, and the GWT compiler converts your Java classes to browser-compliant JavaScript and HTML.

AJAX (“Asynchronous Javascript and XML”) isn’t new, infact the underlying requirements within AJAX, the DHTML, DOM manipulation and XMLHttpRequest were available in 1997. In fact, I implemented functionality to perform what AJAX does back in the late 90’s, probably starting 1999, using solely Javascript, and some of that is still in use today on at least one of my sites. Of course Google made this functionality popular with it’s use in Google Suggest a few years ago.

Google Trends

Saturday, May 27th, 2006

With Google trends you can compare words, and see how they are being used within google searches. You can use it to compare different things.

Check it out at http://www.google.com/trends

For example, I did a search on MySQL,PostgreSQL,Ingres to compare open source databases.

To see how google stacks up with the commercial competitors I tried. MySQL,Oracle,SQL Server,Informix,Sybase

Check it out, it’s very cool

GoogleWack

Friday, May 26th, 2006

This fad started many years ago, and once I achieved it. Well today, I got the google 1 of 1 result. Here are the rules

GoogleWack “Your goal: find that elusive query (two words – no quote marks) with a single, solitary result!”

And my two words were:

ensureClassInitialized xmlbeans

Of course the problem is, by the time you read this, it may no longer be a 1 of 1 result, as my Blog may get referenced. So, I’ve attached a screen print for proof. (yes, it’s an undoctored screen print)

My GoogleWack Blog Entry.