Posts Tagged ‘optimization’

Recent Presentations Buenos Aires MySQL/NoSQL/Cloud Conference

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

The first annual Latin America MySQL/NoSQL/Cloud Conference was held in Buenos Aires Argentina from June 26-28. Kudos to Santiago Lertora from Binlogic who had the vision for the conference in his country and made it happen. I look forward to the second annual event.

My first presentation was “Improving Performance with Better Indexes”. This presentation details the six steps to SQL performance analysis, Capture, Identify, Confirm, Analyze, Optimize and Verify. An explanation of MySQL EXPLAIN, and working examples to create indexes and better covering indexes in several examples are provided. A production example of a 13 table join is used to detail how covering indexes and partial column indexes can make a dramatic improvement in performance. Download Presentation (PDF).

More detailed information about EXPLAIN and creating indexes is available in book Effective MySQL: Optimizing SQL Statements.

My second presentation was “MySQL Backup and Recovery Essentials”. This presentation covers the most common options for MySQL backup and the respective restore options. Also covered is the importance of the master binary logs and point in time recovery capabilities. Download Presentation (PDF)

More detailed information about the right backup and recovery strategy and associated tools is available in book Effective MySQL: Backup and Recovery.

References

Latin America MySQL/NoSQL/Cloud Conference Program.

Optimizing UPDATE and DELETE statements

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

Updated Nov 2011. Check out my latest book on Optimizing SQL Statements for more information. MySQL 5.6.2 also now provides an EXPLAIN syntax for UPDATE and DELETE statements natively.

While most people look at performance optimizations for SELECT statements, UPDATE and DELETE statements are often overlooked. These can benefit from the principles of analyzing the Query Execution Plan (QEP). You can only run an EXPLAIN on a SELECT statement, however it’s possible to rewrite an UPDATE or DELETE statement to perform like a SELECT statement.

To optimize an UPDATE, look at the WHERE clause. If you are using the PRIMARY KEY, no further analysis is necessary. If you are not, it is of benefit to rewrite your UPDATE statement as a SELECT statement and obtain a QEP as previously detailed to ensure optimal indexes are used. For example:

UPDATE t
SET	c1 = ‘x’, c2 = ‘y’, c3 = 100
WHERE c1 = ‘x’
AND	d = CURDATE()

You can rewrite this UPDATE statement as a SELECT statement for using EXPLAIN:

EXPLAIN SELECT c1, c2, c3 FROM	t WHERE c1 = ‘x’ AND	d = CURDATE()

You should now apply the same principles as you would when optimizing SELECT statements.

Improving MySQL Productivity – From Design to Implementation

Thursday, July 1st, 2010

My closing presentation at the dedicated MySQL track at ODTUG Kaleidoscope 2010 discussed various techniques and best practices for improving the ROI of developer resources using MySQL. Included in the sections on Design, Security, Development, Testing, Implementation, Instrumentation and Support were also a number of horror stories of not what to do, combined with practical examples of improving productivity.